Monday Snax

 

View from the cider press at "Montana," the Hill's cabin in Waynesboro.

 

Mike, Windy, and Granddad were unable to make it this weekend, unfortunately, but we are hoping that we get to see all of them very soon. In lieu of their visit, we spent our weekend making apple cider in Waynesboro (photos on Flickr) and watching a shamefully large number of episodes from Friday Night Lights, season four. That show needs to stop making me cry. It’s getting old, producers! It’s getting old.

Here are your Snax and a side of hot cocoa with durable marshmallows that don’t melt away instantly:

The New Studio (Interior). As many of you know, I wrote my thesis on Virginia Woolf’s emphasis on the importance of private space for women artists. This is our wedding photographer’s studio and it’s absolutely beautiful. I have to say I’m quite jealous. Meredith, Woolf would have been proud: you have a gorgeous room of your own! (And Unlimited)

Karl Erik Brondbo. GASP. Where is this Scandinavian paradise?? I must go to there. (Miss Moss)

In Paris, a Threadbare Home From the 1800s. So interesting and romantic. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a home decorated and designed quite like it. (New York Times)

In the Event of Moon Disaster. This is an amazing find: The transcript of the report that President Nixon would have read if Apollo 11 had failed. (Letters of Note)

The Kindle Swindle. A respected and literary lady blogger expresses her opinion on why Kindles just aren’t that great. Huzzah! (Fussy)

A History of Fist-Fueled Author Feuds. Who knew that authors were such a belligerent type? I guess they are. Flavorwire collects a history of fist fights between favorite authors and then decides who won the spat. Women authors are missing from this historical round up, but I guess they fought in other ways… (Flavorwire)

One & The Same. If I was independently wealthy, I think I’d spend a ridiculous amount of money on stationery–particularly cute cards like these. (Where the Lovely Things Are)

Circumstances Under Which I Would Enjoy Whale Watching. Where do they find these people? This is hilarious. I can’t decide which one is my favorite: Scenario one or four. (McSweeney’s)

Taken for Granite. The sad thing is that people will really buy this stuff, too… (Regretsy)

Mini-burst-aster

So. We got pummeled by what appeared to be a tiny tornado last night (also called a “mini-burst” apparently) that caused a lot of damage. We were without power from about 5 p.m. last night until 6 a.m. this morning. Lightning ripped giant oak trees out of the ground, crushing our neighbor’s truck and trailer. Downed power lines splayed across the street. Our porch chairs were flung out in the street when we got home. Caution tape was tied over our street to prevent anyone from entering. It was outrageous. The whole neighborhood was huddled around outside, in shock. The storm happened in about 15 minutes and took out most of Charlottesville’s power in its wake.

We managed to make the most of an unfortunate situation, however. We were planning on making dinner for our new friends Michael and Mallory (Guion had a lovely dish of ricotta-stuffed shells waiting to go in the oven), but after we couldn’t figure out how to start our oven without power, we wandered to the downtown mall. We managed to find the one place that miraculously had power, Eppie’s, and had a nice dinner there. Michael and Mallory were lovely and fun and we had a great time with them. (I was especially pleased to find a fellow reader in Mallory. I haven’t met any girls here except for our neighbors.) Conveniently, the concert we were planning on going to (our worship leader Sam’s band, Hill & Wood) relocated to the Tea Bazaar just next door. And then we came back home and slept in sweltering, humid blackness.

There was something remotely touching about the surge of interdependence in the neighborhood, though. Everyone huddled together in hushed groups on the street, walking together along the dark and eerie downtown mall, swapping horror and survival stories from the afternoon. It evoked images of “The Road,” for some reason, although infinitely less bleak. Charlottesville is still very pretty and lush, despite all the trees on the ground.

Anyway.

I think this is very interesting. This is from the paper I’m proofing today at work.

The critical implication of the research on evolutionary preparedness is that people are likely to react with little fear to certain types of objectively dangerous stimuli that evolution has not prepared them for, such as guns, hamburgers, automobiles, smoking, and unsafe sex, even when they recognize the threat at a cognitive level. Types of stimuli that people are evolutionarily prepared to fear, such as caged spiders, snakes, or heights (when adequate safety measures are in place), evoke a visceral response even when, at a cognitive level, they are recognized to be harmless.

Loewenstein et al., “Risk as Feelings,” Psychological Bulletin, 2001

Guion and I are going away for the weekend! He’s turning 23 on Sunday and so we are going to celebrate his and Emma’s birthdays with a bunch of friends at Emma’s family’s new cabin. Photos of the mini-burst carnage coming on Monday night, ideally. Be safe; have a lovely weekend.