Persona

Sky upon leaving work
We watched Ingmar Bergman’s riveting/terrifying film Persona last night. Aside from inspiring feelings of disunity and morbid fear, the film renewed my unending love of Scandinavian interior design. And the perfection of minimalist (primarily black and white) clothing. And how adorable Nordic languages sound when spoken by women. And how marvelous and unusual it is to watch a film in which 95% of the screen time is focused on women. Men have the minor background roles for once. (This never seems to happen anymore. Not even in independent films. We watch film after film that is about, told from the perspective of, and entirely focused on men.)

Donald Trump keeps proving, again and again, that the GOP electorate has unending tolerance for racism, bigotry, and ignorance. I am ashamed of my nation.

I am currently reading Lawrence Wright’s superbly researched book about the rise of al-Qaeda, The Looming Tower. (It won the Pulitzer when it came out in 2006.) Though now rather old, it gives much-needed context to the current, terrifying rise of ISIS (Da’esh), and the history told here clarifies that, really, this is nothing new; this is just an extension of what has come before. We reap what we sow, and little seems to change.

But I am also reading, in a lighter way, The Sweet Cheat Gone, aka The Fugitive book from À la recherche du temps perdu. I found a beautiful red cloth-bound old copy at the library book sale, and I am so happy to be once again bowled over by Proust.

Monday Snax

Angela comes to visit!

Angela came for the weekend and we had a lovely time together, talking, laughing, watching the unbelievably awful trailer for the Will and Kate movie… I wish she could have stayed all week!

Snax with a side of heavily salted fries:

Walk Score. One of the things I love about where we live is that we can walk practically everywhere! Post office, bank, drug store, church, a billion restaurants, you name it; we can walk there in about 10 minutes. This awesome website lets you type in your address and gives you a score on how walkable it is. It also allows you to enter your work address and gives you estimates on how long it would take you to walk or bike to that location. Really excellent resource to keep in mind, particularly as we’re looking for another Charlottesville home in about a year. (Walk Score)

Is Sugar Toxic? Answer: Probably. A terrifying article; it’s a long summary of various studies on the dangerous effects of sugar/glucose/fructose on our bodies. As if I needed yet another reason to keep up this (mostly!) sugar-free Lent challenge… (New York Times)

Ten People We Wished Had Used the Jon Kyl/Kobe Non-Apology. So hilarious. Public figures! They’re idiots and yet they can never be held responsible for what they say because of this new non-apology/”not intended to be a factual statement” clause. Stephen Colbert’s commentary on this was, of course, amazing. (Daily Intel)

You Have to Listen to Donald Trump Talk About Iraq. Are people SERIOUSLY considering this man as a viable candidate for the presidency!? This is just… incredible. (Daily Intel)

Look At It. Seriously. What photographer thought this was a good idea? (Awkward Family Photos)

Five Reasons Keanu Reeves Should Be the Next RoboCop. The. worst. actor. alive. (Best Week Ever)

Taxonomy of Teas. So pretty! So much tea to adore! (Wendy Chan)

Barnes & Noble Classics. Yet another reason why Kindles aren’t that great. (Wolf Eyebrows)

Pierre Trollier and His Tiny Sheepdogs. Even if you don’t like dogs, I dare you to deny that these tiny Pyrenean French sheepdogs are amazing. They’re the size of your average terriers and they OWN these sheep. Just watch that little dog keep a whole flock of sheep stopped at a stop sign. Just do it. (Three Border Collies)

Famous Authors and Their Dogs. Jill Krementz’s collection of photographs of writers and their dogs. (New York Social Diary)

A Girl and Her Room. A stirring and interesting portfolio of teenage girls and their bedrooms. Photographer Rania Matar jumps between Massachusetts and the Middle East and the distinctions–and similarities–are compelling. (Rania Matar)